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Humane Society of Greater Dayton
Sep 22

Fall is Here! Keep Your Pets Safe

Dog in Autumn Leaves

It is hard to believe, but autumn is upon us. Each season, there are a variety of things that could place your pets in danger and we are working to show you tips and tricks to keep them happy and healthy. Here are just a few things you can do to keep your pets safe this season.

Be Mindful with Rodentcides

As rodents venture indoors to escape from the cooler temperatures of fall and winter, there is an increase of rodenticides used within homes. These rodenticides can be extremely toxic if not fatal if your pets ingest them. If you must use these items in your home, please use them responsibly and with extreme caution. Try to place them in areas that are not easily accessed by your pets.

Watch for Mushrooms

Both Spring and Fall are considered prime time for mushrooms to grow and although 99 percent of mushrooms will do nothing really to harm your pets, there is still that 1 percent that can be extremely toxic. It may be difficult to decipher which mushrooms are good and which are harmful to your pets so the best advice I can give is for your pet to avoid them all. If you spot your pet eating wild mushrooms, contact your vet immediately. You may want to also snip a sample of the mushroom and take it with you in a bag so the vet knows exactly what your pet ate.

Don’t Spill Your Coolant

This time of year, many of us choose to change our vehicle engine’s coolant. Coolants that are ethylene glycol-based can be extremely toxic to our four-legged friends. If you accidently spill any of your coolant, please clean it up immediately. You may want to also consider switching to a propylene glycol-based coolant. Although this is type is not completely nontoxic, it is far less harmful to your pets than the ethylene glycol-based coolant.

Beware of Snakes

This time of year, snakes who are preparing to hibernate can be a little grouchier than normal. This can mean bad news for your curious pet. You may want to learn more about the types of venomous snakes in your area and assess where these snakes may be located near your home. This way, you can make an effort to avoid harmful areas and keep your pets safe from any dangerous snake bites.

As temperatures cool down, you should be mindful of your pet’s needs. Take additional time to care for your pets. Make sure they have plenty of food to help them produce more body heat to fight the cooler temperatures and also make sure they have access to clean, fresh, unfrozen water. With these tips and tricks your pet will have a great fall season. Enjoy the crispness in the air and take a little time to let them play in a leaf pile or two.

Aug 1

Beat the Heat: Keep Pets Safe

Having your pets join you for summer activities can be fun and healthy for both of you. However, it is important to understand how your pet reacts to heat and know what precautions you should take to keep your pet cool this summer.

 

Water is Your Pet’s Best Friend

Unlike humans, pets can’t cool down through sweating. Instead, they release heat through their tongues by way of panting. Just like when humans sweat, the water released through this cool down needs to be replaced. This is why it is so important to have fresh drinking water available for your pets. This is especially important following a long walk or car ride. It helps them stay cool and keeps their body temperature regulated.

Watch for Sunburn

It is funny to think that pets can get sunburned, but those with light-colored skin or hair are more susceptible to the sun’s rays. In some cases, extensive exposure to the sun can even result in skin cancer. There are several sun blocks on the market now that are pet-friendly. Talk to your vet about what would work best for your pet. Make sure that when you apply sunblock, you put it on unprotected areas such as their nose and ears.

Make Pools Safe

There is nothing better on a hot day than a dip in the pool. However, with adults, children and pets, pools can be dangerous if proper safety precautions aren’t put into place. This is especially important if you have an older pet who cannot get in and out of the pool as easily as they used to. If you don’t want your pet in the pool, place a protective fence around the water to keep them out. There are also ramps that can be used to make it easier for your pets to get in and out of the pool if they accidently fall in.

Keep Pets Out of Cars

We’ve been talking a lot about this lately, but it is so important to never leave your pet alone in a parked car. In just a matter of minutes, your pet’s health can go from good to bad as the temperature in your car rises to dangerous levels. Pets are very sensitive to heat and leaving your pets alone in a hot car not only puts them at risk for heatstroke, but could even lead to death. If you see a pet left alone in a parked car, immediately call 9-1-1. 

Provide Some Shade

If your pets are outdoors quite a bit, they need to have a cool spot to relax and get away from the sun. A nice alternative for your pets would be a children’s plastic pool under a shade tree. They can get wet, keep their temperature low and relax in the shade. If you don’t have trees available, you will need to provide some sort of shelter for them to escape the sun and relax in a cooler place.

Avoid High Noon

Exercising your pet should never be done when the sun is at its strongest. Instead choose times that are cooler for you and your pet such as early in the morning or in the late evening. Plus, be aware that hot pavement can hurt the pads of your pet’s feet. If you don’t want to walk on it barefoot then there is a good chance it is too hot for your pets.

Remember Your Feathered Friends

Birds naturally have a higher body temperature than cats or dogs so they typically fare better during the warmer months. However, an increase in their body temperature can cause heat exhaustion in your feathered friend. Make sure to keep their cages out of direct sunlight and keep fresh drinking water for them. If you want to give them a real treat, take a spray bottle and place it on the mist setting. Add some cool water and gently spray your bird. It will act as a nice way for them to cool down during summer.

Keep Small Animals Cool

Smaller animals such as rabbits and ferrets typically spend most of their time in cages. If you can’t keep your home cool enough for these pets, consider adding water to a plastic bottle and freezing it. Wrap a towel around the bottle and place it in the corner of their cage. Your smaller pets can lie close to the bottle and stay cool as the temperatures rise.


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 115 years ago, it is the largest and most established “no-kill” animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937- 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org.

Jun 29

Keep Pets Safe This Fourth of July

Dog-Fourth-of-JulyThe Fourth of July is just around the corner! With this holiday, you may be thinking of cookouts, lounging outside with friends and family and of course fireworks. Although this holiday can be relaxing and fun for your family, it can be stressful and scary for your pet. Here are a few tips to keep your pet relaxed and healthy during your Fourth of July festivities.

Avoid the Fireworks

Not only can loud fireworks scare your pets, making them more likely to run away or hide, the use of home fireworks can pose the risk of burns to your curious pets. Many fireworks contain toxic substances that could be lethal if ingested. If your pet is scared of fireworks, try to make the evening as calm as possible for them. Keep them at home and don’t take them to Fourth of July festivities. Make sure to keep them in an escape-proof area where they can feel safe and out of harm’s way. Play some calming music to drown out the boom of the fireworks and provide them with some familiar items such as their bed or toys to let them feel comforted.

ID Your Pets

With so much commotion and loud noises associated with the Fourth of July, pets may run away or become lost in an attempt to hide. Make sure your pets stay safe and are returned to you if they become lost. Have an identification collar on your pets that clearly has a number to call if they are found. In addition, it is important to microchip your pets. Microchipping your pet takes just minutes to do. It is just a little chip (the size of a grain of rice) that goes under your pet’s skin. If your pet arrives to a shelter or vet’s office, the chip can be scanned and your contact information will pop up allowing them to notify you that they found your pet.

Don’t Leave Alcohol Unattended

Alcohol can be poisonous to your pets. If it is consumed, your pet can become very intoxicated, weak, depressed or even go into a coma. In severe cases, respiratory failure can occur and may even result in death.

Watch What They Eat

With so many cookouts planned for the Fourth, it is easy for your pets to hop up and grab themselves a special treat. It is also more tempting to feed your pets a scrap or two from your plate so they feel part of the festivities. Resist these temptations. By keeping your pets away from raw foods and by feeding them their normal diet, you are helping your pet’s digestive system. Changing even one meal for your pet can give them diarrhea or severe indigestion. Plus, there are many common foods that people eat such as onions, chocolate, avocados, grapes and raisons that can be very toxic to animals.

Avoid the Repellent

Bugs can be a nuisance to you and your pet while enjoying the outdoors. However, don’t be tempted to apply bug or insect repellent to your pet unless it specifically says that it is pet-friendly. If your pet ingests this product, they can suffer many side effects such as drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy or excessive thirst. Also products containing DEET can lead to neurological problems in your pets. These same issues can also arise with the use of sunscreen, so please make sure anything you apply to your pet is specifically pet-friendly.

 


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 115 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937- 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org

Jun 15

Don't Leave Pets in Hot Cars

DogInHotCarEach year, thousands of family pets suffer from heatstrokes or suffocation after being left in a parked car. Even if you are going into a store for just a second, the results can be tragic. In fact, many of the sad stories we hear about animals who die in cars are a result of someone who just had to run in very quickly and grab something. What they and many others don’t realize is that in just minutes your car can heat to dangerous levels, which put your pets at risk.

It actually doesn’t even need to be that hot out for tragedy to strike your pet. In fact, on a day that is just 75 degrees outside, a car can heat to 88 degrees in 10 minutes and rise to 122 degrees in less than an hour. Even with windows cracked, temperatures can be too high and dangerous for pets far too quickly.

What You Can Do

 

If you witness a pet that has been left in a hot car, you must act quickly. Here are a few steps you can take to help save the pet’s life.  

  1. If you see something that looks wrong, don’t be shy, speak up. If there is a pet that is alone in a vehicle call the Humane Society of Greater Dayton immediately at (855) PETS-911. You can also call the Animal Resource Center at (937) 898-4457 or your local police department.
  2. Try to find the car’s owner. If you are in a parking lot where all the cars are clearly going to one store, go inside and have the manager do an announcement over the intercom. The quicker you react to this, the better chances you are giving to the pet for survival.
  3. Educate people by hanging signs in local places such as pharmacies, grocery stores and Laundromats that remind pet owners how important it is to not leave pets unattended in a car.

Together, we can keep our pets safe and healthy during the hot weather season. For more information or for signs to hang up in the stores in your community, contact the Humane Society of Greater Dayton’s cruelty and neglect department at (937) 262-8091.

 


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 115 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937- 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org

Mar 24

Why Rabbits Make Amazing Pets

HSGD-3144432As we get closer to Easter it is tempting to splurge on a cute and cuddly bunny as a gift for your children. We encourage all potential adopters to understand that rabbits require a commitment and can live for around 10 years when cared for properly. Don’t adopt a rabbit on a whim. Adopt a rabbit because you love rabbits and are willing to put in the commitment and love needed to give them a great forever home. If you can’t commit to a long-term pet, we recommend maybe giving your child a chocolate rabbit or a stuffed rabbit toy for Easter as an alternative. 

Many people don’t realize that the Humane Society of Greater Dayton works with all types of animals. In fact, we have a rabitat at our shelter with some amazing bunnies and rabbits up for adoption. Rabbits can make amazing pets and can be trained similar to cats. If you have never considered adopting a rabbit before, check out these great reasons why a rabbit could make a great pet for your family!

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